Designing a Multidimensional Poverty Index

In this course, you will learn to develop a holistic multidimensional poverty index that integrates income-based inequalities with deprivations across health, education, housing, sanitation, employment and livelihoods, food security, environment, and other living standards to inform the implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

Course starts: 16 March 2020
Course ends: 17 April 2020
Duration: 5 weeks
Estimated effort: 2 – 3 hours per week
Languages: English
 Requirements: Internet connection

FAQs Meet the Experts Course Syllabus

 

NEW ADDITION TO THE COURSE: Due to high interest, content for Week 5 will now include a video focusing on the use of MPI within the COVID-19 emergency response so that you can put this training into practice quickly.

UNDP and OPHI are excited to offer you a Massive Online Open Course (MOOC) on Designing a Multidimensional Poverty Index (MPI). This five-week course facilitated in English draws on a handbook, How to Build a National Multidimensional Poverty Index (MPI): Using the MPI to inform the SDGs, launched by UNDP and OPHI in July 2019. The MPI complements traditional monetary poverty measures by capturing severe deprivations in education, health, living standards, employment, safety, and many other dimensions of poverty. Using country and sub-national examples, this course offers detailed practical guidance for policymakers, technical experts, and other stakeholders on how to design an MPI at the national and local levels.

MOOC highlights and outcomes

  • Gain hands-on tools to develop a comprehensive MPI capturing multiple simultaneous deprivations faced by the poor
  • Interact with experts who are actively engaged in developing national and subnational MPIs
  • Join the Community-of-Practice committed to ending multidimensional poverty
  • Take a deep dive into rich learning materials
  • Receive a certificate of completion from premier international development institutions

Course topics

  • Week 1: Introduction to the Multidimensional Poverty Index
  • Week 2: Generating support for the national MPI
  • Week 3: The technical process of creating a national MPI – Part 1
  • Week 4: The technical process of creating a national MPI – Part 2
  • Week 5: Using national MPIs as policy tools

Learning objectives

By the time the course is completed, you will be able to:

  • Understand the steps involved in developing a robust MPI
  • Examine the normative choices and technical requirements of multidimensional poverty measurement
  • Understand the key aspects of stakeholder engagement in designing and using an MPI
  • Monitor, analyze and report progress in reducing multidimensional poverty at national and local levels, in line with the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development

Course completion requirements

To receive the certificate of course completion, participants must:

  • Complete five online lessons
  • Pass five weekly quizzes
  • Listen to all course lectures
  • Pass the final test
  • Complete the course survey

Please note that you must be registered for the course and logged in to view the course content.

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Course Includes

  • 4 Modules
  • 15 Activities
  • 3 Quizzes

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Viktoriia BrezheniukLisa KingMaria SakukumaGioconda JaimesAurang zaib Recent comment authors
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Lisa King
Member

Aloha and yes, I have had at least three technical issues with the course too.

-Some of the scroll bars will not move downward so you cannot read the bottom of the slide. That is frustrating.

-When I click on the ‘contact course coordinator’ button it just sends apologies for not being able to connect. This is when I am logged in.

-I too have not been able to click on the ‘mark complete’ button after viewing the lectures. What I wind up doing is either viewing them a second time or let them play a second or third time with the volume turned down, leave, and then return to see if the ‘mark complete’ button has then turned blue so I can click on it and get credit for completing that part of the assignment. But let me emphasize that I have watched it the first time and only do this because the ‘mark complete’ button does not work after viewing it the first time.

I am sure they will correct these issues soon.

Maria Sakukuma
Member

Hello ! I have a requeriment, could you provide me the slides from lessons in pdf. Thanks.

Viktoriia Brezheniuk
Moderator

Hello dear Maria, thank you for checking. Since the lessons are interactive, they are not available in PDF. Please note that you will be able to access the lessons even after the course ends. When the course is over, the MOOC course room will be transformed into a self-paced module, and you will be able to access all the course materials indefinitely. *However, to download the course completion certificate for the Massive Open Online Course, you must complete the course requirements by the end of the MOOC.
Thank you, and please let us know if you have other questions.

Gioconda Jaimes
Member

Good Night ! I have a requeriment, could you provide me the slides from lesson 3 in pdf. Thanks and have a Nice Day

Viktoriia Brezheniuk
Moderator

Hello dear Gioconda, since the lessons are interactive, they are not available in PDF. Please note that you will be able to access the lessons even after the course ends. When the course is over, the MOOC course room will be transformed into a self-paced module, and you will be able to access all the course materials indefinitely. *However, to download the course completion certificate for the Massive Open Online Course, you must complete the course requirements by the end of the MOOC.

Virginia Leal Cota
Member

Hi! I have a technical issue. I cannot mark as complete the video lecture of Sabina Alkire in week 1. Does someone have this problem?

Viktoriia Brezheniuk
Moderator

Hello dear Virginia,
Thank you for checking. If you watch the entire video, from start to finish, the Mark complete button will be activated (will become blue), and you will be able to click it to mark the activity as complete. Could you let me know if you have watched the entire video? If so, we will look into this more closely.
Thank you!

Vibhuti Raina
Member

When will week 4 available?

Viktoriia Brezheniuk
Moderator

Thank you for checking, dear Vibhuti. Content is published each Sunday for the week ahead. Course materials for Week 4 will become available in the course room on Sunday, 5 April 2020. Please let us know if you have other questions.

Aurang zaib
Member

For course completion certificate, there is a requirement that a participant must Complete five online lessons, please guide about these online lessons.

Viktoriia Brezheniuk
Moderator

Thank you for checking, dear Aurang zaib. Please find below the links to the three online lessons currently available. You can also find them in the syllabus tab on top of this page:

– Lessons 1: https://learningfornature.org/en/topic/lesson-1-introduction-to-the-multidimensional-approach-to-poverty-eradication/
– Lesson 2: https://learningfornature.org/en/topic/lesson-2-generating-support-for-the-national-mpi/
– Lesson 3: https://learningfornature.org/en/topic/lesson-3-the-technical-process-of-creating-a-national-mpi-part-1/

When you go to Course Content on this page and expand the tabs for each of the 3 weeks currently available, you will find the lessons within the week’s content.

Regarding Lessons 4 and 5, content is published each Sunday for the week ahead. Therefore, Lesson 4 will become available in the course room on Sunday 5 April 2020, and Lesson 5 – on Sunday 12 April.

You can find all the details about each week’s requirements through the weekly instructional emails we send out on Mondays. Please let me know if you’d like me to re-share those or if you have other questions. Thank you!

Aurang zaib
Member

Thank you Viktoriia Brezheniuk

Hussein Mohamed Ali
Member

Hello my colleagues, i’m very much excited the course.
I’m Wishing everybody like me……

Viktoriia Brezheniuk
Moderator

Greetings and welcome to the course, dear Hussein Mohamed!

saw mu
Member

Thank you Maria. I am interested in that idea.

Mohsin Khan
Member

Our latest paper on MDP using panel data analysis to have some more information on how to use MPI and FGT methods.
https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02185385.2020.1712663

Mohsin Khan
Member

Typo in video lectures as Mr. Shakeel Ahmad is written as “Mr. Admad”. Thanks

Viktoriia Brezheniuk
Moderator

Thank you for pointing this out, dear Mohsin. We’ve corrected this.

Frequently Asked Questions

Course Experts


Shakeel Ahmad

Shakeel is a Development Economist by training and currently serves as Country Programme Specialist at the UNDP Bangkok Regional Hub. Before assuming his current post, he was the Assistant Resident Representative and Chief of Development Policy Unit in UNDP Pakistan. Mr. Ahmad advised the Government of Pakistan on the national Multidimensional Poverty Index and its use for poverty targeting. He remained a member of the high-level committee of the Planning Commission of Pakistan on SDGs and Poverty Alleviation. Mr. Ahmad has 19 year of experience in the development sector. He has a post-graduate degree from the London School of Economics and Political Science.


Sabina Alkire

Sabina is the Director of the Oxford Poverty and Human Development Initiative (OPHI), a research centre within the Oxford Department of International Development, University of Oxford. Her research interests and publications include multidimensional poverty measurement and analysis, welfare economics, Amartya Sen’s capability approach, Bhutan’s Gross National Happiness index, and human development. She holds a DPhil in Economics from the University of Oxford.


Cecilia Calderon

Cecilia is a Statistics Specialist at the Human Development Report Office (HDRO) within the United Nations Development Programme. Her topics of interest include multidimensional poverty and deprivations, with special interest in multidimensional poverty for children. She is also involved in the calculation of other measures of human development: the Human Development Index, gender disparities and inequalities in income and education.
Before joining HDRO, Cecilia has worked at the Population Council, the Inter-American Development Bank and the Center for Distributive, Labor and Social Studies at the Universidad Nacional de La Plata (CEDLAS), Argentina. Cecilia holds a Ph.D. and a Master in Demography from the University of Pennsylvania and a Master’s in Economics from the Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Argentina. Her Ph.D. dissertation analyses the relationship between the nutritional status of the mothers and its impact of the growth and development of their children.


Elena Danilova-Cross

Elena is a Programme Specialist on Poverty and Inequality at UNDP Istanbul Regional Hub. She has over 10 years of professional experience in integrating human and sustainable development into policy practice as well as statistical, mainstreaming, acceleration and policy support for Agenda 2030 and SDGs. Elena Initiates and manages studies, research and publications on social inclusion, human development, multidimensional poverty and inequality, including coordination and quality assurance and evaluation of human development reporting, policy papers and other cross-thematic reports.


Jakob Dirksen

Jakob is part of OPHI's research and outreach teams and the research assistant to OPHI director, Sabina Alkire. He is also lecturer and Research Associate at Leuphana University of Lüneburg. Previously, Jakob held research positions at the Blavatnik School of Government and Mansfield College and worked in diplomacy at the German Foreign Office. His research interests lie in theory and measurement of well-being, poverty and inequalities, sustainable development, and the capability approach.


Maya Evans

Maya is the Research Communications Officer at OPHI and is responsible for sharing the work of OPHI around the world through the press, social media, websites and events. She advises on and supports governments and organisations with communications activities aimed at launching and engaging multiple audiences with Multidimensional Poverty Indices (MPIs). Maya has worked in alumni relations at the University of Oxford including heading the global events programme for the University of Oxford Alumni Office.


James Foster

James is Professor of Economics and International Affairs at The Elliott School of International Affairs at The George Washington University. Professor Foster received his Ph.D. in Economics from Cornell University where he received the Selma Fine Goldsmith Award for his dissertation. He held positions at the Krannert School of Management at Purdue University and Department of Economics at Vanderbilt before joining the Elliott School. He has been a visiting professor at the London School of Economics, Cornell, Essex, Oxford, Harvard, and the University of the Americas in Puebla, Mexico. He received the Unilever Fellowship (UK) and the Robert Wood Johnson Investigator Award in Health Policy, and holds a Doctorate Honoris Causa, from Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Hidalgo (Mexico).


Iván Gonzalez

Iván is a Regional Policy Advisor in Poverty Reduction and Sustainable Development at UNDP’s Regional Hub for Latin America and the Caribbean. He is an economist and holds a Master's degree in Public Policy from ITAM, as well as a Master's in Economics and a DPhil in Development Studies from the University of Oxford, England. Iván is a former OPHI collaborator. He has also worked for the Mexican government in different capacities at the Ministries of Tourism, Social Development and Urban Development. Iván's most recent publications focus on social protection in Africa and the regional study on environmental variables in MPIs.


Ross Jennings

Ross is a Research Officer at OPHI working in the outreach team to support governments, international agencies and others who are developing multidimensional poverty indices (MPIs). Ross holds a Master’s degree in Public and Development Management and is currently a PhD Candidate at the University of the Witwatersrand, exploring the intersection between poverty and civic engagement. He has worked in the applied social research environment for over 25 years across civil society, the private sector and the public sector.


Fanni Kovesdi

Fanni is an MPI Data Analyst and Supervisor at OPHI, working on the Changes over Time project, which focuses on trends in multidimensional poverty. She holds a Bachelor’s degree in Politics and Sociology from the University of Bristol and a Master’s degree in Sociology from the University of Oxford. Before joining OPHI in her current role, Fanni worked as a Research Assistant on the Global MPI 2018 with OPHI and as a Research Assistant on an ESRC-funded project looking at dual career couples’ trajectories. Fanni’s main interests lie in inequality research. Her previous work has focused on migration, education, employment and status inequality.


Nathalie Milbach- Bouché

Nathalie is a development economist with over 20 years of professional experience with the academia, the private sector, the UN and other development partners in more than 40 countries. From 2010 until her present assignment, she served successively as UNDP Poverty Practice leader for West and Central Africa and for the Arab Region. She started serving UNDP as policy specialist for transition economies in Asia-Pacific (2001 to 2005). In between (2006 to 2009), she worked as senior economist for the FAO in Bangladesh, where she supported the preparation of the National Food Policy Plan of Action and supervised research on food security. From 1999 to 2000, she led an EU-TACIS capacity development project in economic analysis, following five years of service as temporary teacher/researcher at the University of Auvergne (France). She holds a PhD (2001) in Development Economics and a Master’s in project Analysis from the University of Auvergne.


Juliana Milovich

Juliana is a researcher within OPHI’s outreach team, supporting governments in their development of national multidimensional poverty indices. She is also part of the Global MPI team, co-leading the work on non-DHS and non-MICS datasets in the Global MPI 2018 and 2020. Juliana holds a PhD in Economics from the University Paris Nanterre, where she also works as an Assistant Professor. Her current research focuses on the determinants of poverty and well-being and, more precisely, on the factors impacting (positively and negatively) child undernutrition in Guatemala.


Hector Moreno

Hector is a Research Officer at OPHI. He holds a PhD in Economics from the Paris School of Economics (PSE) in France. Previously, he served as Research Coordinator for the Human Development Research Office at the UNDP Mexico, and as Under Director of Poverty Methodologies for the Mexican government at CONEVAL. He has also served as a consultant for private, public and international institutions. His fields of research include wealth and income distribution, poverty measurement, economic mobility and development economics. Hector’s research has received research-oriented awards from diverse institutions in Mexico, including the Banamex-Citibank prize in economics, the Tlacaélel prize for economic consulting, and the National University’s award for applied research in economics.


Bishwa Nath Tiwari

Bishwa engages in writing analytical products, including UNDP’s flagship reports, and ensures the quality of national human development reports offering technical and advisory services to UNDP country offices. He also leads the work on multidimensional poverty measures in UNDP Bangkok Regional Hub and provides support to country offices in programming, review and follow-up of the SDGs. Prior to joining Bangkok Regional Hub, he worked at UNDP Nepal and Bangladesh. He started his career as a teacher and researcher in Tribhuvan University, Nepal. Bishwa holds a Ph. D. in Economics from University of Rajasthan, India; Master’s degree in environmental and Resource Economics from University College London, and Master’s in Economics from Tribhuvan University, Nepal.


Ricardo Nogales

Ricardo is a Research Officer at OPHI. He holds a Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in Economics and a PhD in Econometrics, all from the University of Geneva. Before joining OPHI, he was an Associate Lecturer in Economics at the School of Economics and Finance of the Universidad Privada Boliviana and a Research Assistant at the United Nations Research Institute for Social Development (UNRISD) in Switzerland. He has carried out research activities in development economics, poverty reduction and human development with the IDB, UNDP, ILO, World Bank, Oxfam and IDRC. Ricardo has been an external consultant for several public organizations in Bolivia, including the Program for Strategic Research, the Central Bank, the Institute for Agricultural Insurance and the Ministry of Economics and Public Finance.

 

Christian Oldiges

Christian is the Co-Director of Metrics and Policy at OPHI, co-leading the outreach team in South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa to support governments in building national multidimensional poverty indices. He undertakes micro-econometric research on the determinants of multidimensional poverty. Christian holds a PhD in Economics from Heidelberg University. During his doctoral studies, his research focused on evaluating welfare impacts of a huge rural employment programme in India and measuring food security.


Davina Osei

Davina is a Researcher within the outreach team of OPHI. She supports national governments in the development, analysis and use of national multidimensional poverty indices (MPIs). She holds a PhD in Economics from the UNU-MERIT/Maastricht University and a Master’s in Applied Economics from the University of Strathclyde. Prior to joining OPHI, Davina worked as a tutor and researcher at UNU-MERIT. She has also consulted for UN FAO and the African Development Bank. Davina has worked with the UNDP Global Environment Facility Small Grants Programme (GEF/SGP) on environmental and sustainable livelihoods projects, as well as the GIZ African Cashew Initiative (ACi) on agricultural and human development projects. Davina’s expertise lies in development economics with a focus on institutions, environment, poverty and well-being.


Monica Pinilla-Roncancio

Monica is the Co-Director of Metrics and Policy at OPHI, co-leading the outreach team. She coordinates outreach work in Latin America, East Asia and some countries in Africa and Middle East. Monica is a trained Physiotherapist with a Master’s degree in Economics from Universidad del Rosario. She also has a Master’s degree in Health Economics, Policy and Law from Erasmus University Rotterdam. Monica received her PhD in Social Policy at the University of Birmingham. From 2016 to 2018, she was as a Postdoctoral Researcher at Universidad de los Andes, where she remains an Assistant Professor. Her main research interests include disability, multidimensional poverty, inequality and health economics.


Sophie Scharlin-Pettee

Sophie is an MPI Data Analyst and Supervisor at OPHI, working on the Changes over Time project, which focuses on trends in multidimensional poverty. Previously at OPHI, she contributed to the data preparation, computation, analysis, and report publication for the global MPI revision in 2018. Before OPHI, Sophie supported ESRC-funded research investigating dual career couples’ life course outcomes from a time-use, longitudinal, and cross-national perspective. She also interned at the Consortium on Gender, Security, and Human Rights in Boston. Sophie holds a Master’s degree in Sociology from the University of Oxford. Her research explored the dynamic gender inequalities in the former Soviet Union.


Kaugelo Sebidi

Kgaugelo is a Researcher and part of the team responsible for the coordination and management of the Multidimensional Poverty Peer Network (MPPN) activities and events. He holds a Master’s on Philosophy in Development Studies from the University of Oxford.

 

 


Achim Steiner

Achim Steiner became UNDP Administrator on 19 June 2017 and will serve for a term of four years. Mr. Steiner is also the Vice-Chair of the UN Sustainable Development Group, which unites 40 entities of the UN system that work to support sustainable development. Over nearly three decades, Achim Steiner has been a global leader on sustainable development, climate resilience and international cooperation. Prior to joining UNDP, he was Director of the Oxford Martin School and Professorial Fellow of Balliol College, University of Oxford. Mr Steiner has served across the United Nations system, looking at global challenges from both a humanitarian and a development perspective.


Fekadu Terefe

Fekadu has more than 25 years of experience in the field of development. He is currently working as Programme Specialist (Inclusive Growth) with UNDP Regional Hub in Amman. He previously served as policy specialist (inclusive growth and human development), and as an advisor on MDGs, gender and CSO. Before joining UNDP, Fekadu worked as food security programme/policy officer with ActionAid and as Project Officer on demobilization and reintegration programme with the German Agency for Technical Cooperation (GTZ). He also worked with the public sector on development planning and budgeting. Fekadu holds Master’s degrees in International Economic Policy and Analysis and in Development Planning and Management, and a Bachelor’s degree in Agricultural Economics.


Course Syllabus

WEEK 1WEEK 2WEEK 3WEEK 4WEEK 5

Week 1: Introduction to a multidimensional approach to poverty elimination

Week 1 provides the background for undertaking the multidimensional approach to poverty eradication. It explains the difference between monetary and multidimensional poverty, outlines motivations for the multidimensional approach to poverty eradication, defines a national MPI and explains its objectives and value.

REQUIRED: Lesson and Quiz

Lesson 1: Introduction to the multidimensional approach to poverty eradication (45 min)

Objectives:

  • Describe the difference between monetary and multidimensional poverty
  • Outline motivations for the multidimensional approach to poverty eradication
  • Define a national MPI and its objectives
  • Explain the value of a national MPI

Quiz 1: Introduction to the multidimensional approach to poverty eradication

Quiz 1 checks your comprehension of the material covered in Lesson 1.

RECOMMENDED: Case studies
OPTIONAL: Discussion forum

1. Where does your country stand in terms of the level of income and multidimensional poverty?

  • Review the UNDP and OPHI report in the Global MPI 2019 Illuminating Inequalities (page 18) and one Country Briefing of your choice, and share the statistics for your country and your reflections on the discussion forum.
  • Reflect on the differences between the percentage of the population living below the income poverty line and the population in multidimensional poverty for your selected country. What factors do you think contribute to this difference?

2. Which of the possible policy uses of national MPIs do you think would be most appealing to policymakers in your country? Please explain.

3. Review the list of countries that have implemented national or local MPIs as official poverty measures. Select one of the countries from the list and research the information about that country’s MPI available online. Based on your research, identify the motivation of your selected country to compute a national MPI and share your findings on the discussion forum.

View the discussion forum for Week 1 here.

Week 2: Generating support for the national MPI

Week 2 discusses the process of engagement with different actors and how institutional arrangements facilitate the process of designing, computing and using national MPIs. It also explains the relevance of a solid communications strategy to guarantee the sustainability of the measure over time.

REQUIRED: Lesson and Quiz

Lesson 2: Generating support for the national MPI (45 min)

Objectives:

  • Outline the four pivotal requirements for the sustainability and effectiveness of the national MPI as a policy tool
  • Convey the importance of having a clear sense of the relevant stakeholders and defining a compact stratefy to bring key players on booard at teh right time
  • Describe the characteristics of a successfuk communications strategy for a national MPI process

Quiz 2: Generating support for the national MPI

Quiz 2 checks your comprehension of the material covered in Lesson 2.

RECOMMENDED: Case studies
OPTIONAL: Discussion forum

  1. If you were to make an elevator pitch for your national MPI to your country’s top leadership, what would it look like? Share it on the discussion forum in writing or make a video of your pitch (under 1 min).
  2. Think of 3-5 factoids you can use to draw stakeholders’ attention to the value of the national MPI in your context? Share them on the discussion forum.
  3. Follow a template for a communications plan for a national MPI presented in Lesson 2 (slide 17) and brainstorm responses to the first five steps given your national context: overall goals, communications objectives, target audiences, key messages, communications tools.

View the discussion forum for Week 2 here.

Week 3: The technical process of creating a national MPI – Part 1

Week 3 presents the Alkire-Foster method and discusses the process of building the multidimensional poverty measure, from the definition of the unit of identification to the selection of the poverty cut-off. The week also presents real examples of how countries have made these decisions and provides technical and normative arguments to validate each of them. Finally, the week's content discusses the different sources of information that can be used when developing a national MPI.

REQUIRED: Lesson and Quiz

Lesson 3: The technical process of creating a national MPI – Part 1 (45 min)

Objectives:

  • Describe each step of the design process for a national MPI
  • Showcase real examples of countries’ decisions in the design of their national MPI’s
  • Outline the different sources of information that can be used when developing a national MPI
  • Describe the steps involved in computing an MPI using the Alkire-Foster method

Quiz 3: The technical process of creating a national MPI – Part 1

Quiz 3 checks your comprehension of the material covered in Lesson 3.

OPTIONAL: Discussion forum

  1. Using the tips from Lesson 3 (slide 7), draft a purpose statement for a national MPI for your country or a country of your choice. Share it on the discussion forum.
  2. Review the list of countries that have implemented national or local MPIs as official poverty measures. Select one of the countries from the list and analyze the choice of dimensions, indicators and weights in its MPI. Share the findings for a country of your choice on the discussion forum.
  3. Brainstorm the universe of indicators that could be relevant for your national MPI. Explain your choices.
  4. Assign weights to each indicator you included in the universe of indicators to indicate their relative importance. Explain your choices.

View the discussion forum for Week 3 here.

Week 4: The technical process of creating a national MPI – Part 2

Week 4 explores how to analyze candidate measures, how to select the final version of the national MPI, and what additional analyses should be conducted. The week's content also discusses how to analyze changes over time and track progress in the MPI, and provides a summary of how the national MPI could be presented to the public.

The Week 4 content will be made available on 6 April 2020.

REQUIRED: Lesson and Quiz

Lesson 4: The technical process of creating a national MPI – Part 2 (45 min)

Objectives:

  • Outline the steps needed to calculate and analyze the candidate measures for a national MPI
  • Explain the additional analyses that shuold be conducted before selecting the final version of an MPI
  • Explain how to conduct a detailed analysis of the results and final checks for a national MPI
  • Outline principles for revision a national MPI
  • Discuss ways to analyze changes over time and track progress in the MPI
  • Provide recommendations for presenting a national MPI to the public

Quiz 4: The technical process of creating a national MPI – Part 2

Quiz 4 checks your comprehension of the material covered in Lesson 4.

REQUIRED: Lectures

  • Shakeel Ahmed, Assistant Country Director and Chief, Development Policy Unit for UNDP in Pakistan
  • Davina Osei, Researcher within the outreach team of the Oxford Poverty and Human Development Initiative
  • Ricardo Nogales, Research Officer at the Oxford Poverty and Human Development Initiative

RECOMMENDED: Case studies

  • To be announced* 

OPTIONAL: Discussion forum

  1. When it comes to presenting your national MPI to the public, which stakeholder group do you anticipate it being difficult to convince? What concerns do you think this group might have and how would you address them?
  2. In preparation for the launch of your national MPI, you will need to decide on each speakers’ key messages to make sure that critical points are covered and avoid confusion. Imagine you are tasked with drafting the talking points for one of the high level speakers. Share 3-5 of the talking points you would propose.
  3. In Lesson 4, John Hammock gives an example of a quick and simplified way of explaining the Alkire-Foster method to politicians. Draft a paragraph outlining how you would explain the AF methods to politicians in your country.
  4. Imagine that you have run robustness analyses and statistical tests for your national MPI, and they conclude that your estimates and comparisons are not robust and/or statistically significant. What would be your next step?

Week 5: Using national MPIs as policy tools

Week 5 presents examples of how countries have used their national MPI as a policy tool to reduce multidimensional poverty.

The Week 5 content will be made available on 13 April 2020.

REQUIRED: Lesson and Quiz

Lesson 5: Using national MPIs as policy tools (45 min)

Objectives:

  • Outline primary policy applications of national MPIs
  • Give an overview of multidimensional targeting and multidimensional impact evaluation as some of the applications of national MPIs
  • Share examples of ways in which countries have used MPIs in their national contexts

Quiz 5: Using national MPIs as policy tools

Quiz 5 checks your comprehension of the material covered in Lesson 5.

REQUIRED: Lectures

Christian Oldiges, Co-Director of Metrics and Policy at the Oxford Poverty and Human Development Initiative

RECOMMENDED: Case studies

  • Mexico

OPTIONAL: Discussion forum

  1. What are the primary policy applications you can foresee for your national MPI?
  2. The support of which stakeholders in your country would be critical to enable the MPI to be used as a policy tool?
  3. Imagine that you do not have political support for using your national MPI as a policy tool. What arguments would you present to politicians in your country to convince them to consider policy applications of the MPI?